Those were the freakest papers in the whole congress: someone talking about Chemistry and Physics in a congress about Greek Palaeography!
Usually people (at least in Spain) think and tell me when asked about what I do (I study Greek manuscripts) that my work is useless, not very necessary, a waste of time and money for the government (I got a public grant after working hard at university). 
This week I was in Hamburg in **the** Greek palaeography congress. This guy talked about dating manuscripts by analyzing the chemical components of ink (picture on the middle) and showed a picture of the Large Hadron Collider (picture on top). The next speaker talked about something similar, but by the reflection of different types of light on the ink (picture on the bottom).
Any of these people are physicist, but philologist. Our discipline won’t change the world right now, but invites us to think about what we are and what we were and combines lots of amazing knowlegdes at one time.
But some people still think that’s not cool because “we studied Literature and Fine Arts”. These people will never understand the special feeling I have when I go to an historical library to study a manuscript and I can tweet from there: “Hey ev’rybody! I’m just watching a wonderful manuscript binded in silk from 500 years ago!”

Those were the freakest papers in the whole congress: someone talking about Chemistry and Physics in a congress about Greek Palaeography!

Usually people (at least in Spain) think and tell me when asked about what I do (I study Greek manuscripts) that my work is useless, not very necessary, a waste of time and money for the government (I got a public grant after working hard at university). 

This week I was in Hamburg in **the** Greek palaeography congress. This guy talked about dating manuscripts by analyzing the chemical components of ink (picture on the middle) and showed a picture of the Large Hadron Collider (picture on top). The next speaker talked about something similar, but by the reflection of different types of light on the ink (picture on the bottom).

Any of these people are physicist, but philologist. Our discipline won’t change the world right now, but invites us to think about what we are and what we were and combines lots of amazing knowlegdes at one time.

But some people still think that’s not cool because “we studied Literature and Fine Arts”. These people will never understand the special feeling I have when I go to an historical library to study a manuscript and I can tweet from there: “Hey ev’rybody! I’m just watching a wonderful manuscript binded in silk from 500 years ago!”